. on cases that have to do with the

. From what I understood
from Shea’s article is that his concerns are that the decision that might be
decided on Burwell v Hobby Lobby Stores might have the same outcome as past
religious cases like Wisconsin
v. Yoder. Another concern that I thought Shea brought up was that of exempting
people who are religious from doing things that everyone has to do In the
country. In other words as said in Christopher Shea’s article “If one religious
group got that privilege, then all should”. Basically decisions that have to do
with religion and those that are not religious have to be treated the same, and
Shea’s concern is that the Hobby lobby case might have the same outcome as past
cases that dealt with religion. I think that Shea’s concerns are somewhat
realistic considering that the courts do not always make the same decisions on
cases that have to do with the same subject in this case that being religion.

2.  After reading
Hamilton’s article the day after the Hobby Lobby decision and seeing where she stands
on the outcome of the case I think I found some passages from Justice
Ginsburg’s dissenting opinion where she states ” the exemption sought by Hobby
Lobby and Conestoga would override significant interests of the corporations’
employees and covered dependents. It would deny legions of women who do not
hold their employers’ beliefs access to contraceptive coverage that the ACA
would otherwise secure” (page 8 of Ginsburg’s dissent). This passage from
Justice Ginsburg’s dissent supports what Marci Hamilton thinks of the ruling, if
someone (employee) dose not share the same beliefs as the person they are
working for they shouldn’t be excluded from the rights they have as employees
for that company simply because they have different religious beliefs.           

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Shea, Christopher. “Beyond Belief The Debate
over Religious Tolerance.” 9 June 2014.

 

Burwell, Secretary of Health and Human services v. Hobby
Lobby stories. Supreme
Court of United States. 25 March. 30, June 2014. Print      

 

Hamiltion , Marci. “NY Times: A Minefield of
Extreme Religious Liberty.”